Queen Mary Model Ship

SKU: 2SMSSC005
Stock: 3
Price:
$384.99

Qty: - +

Queen Mary Ship Model Free Shipping

The Queen Mary model ship measures 40"(long) 12"(high) 5"(wide) and is shipped fully assembled, ready to be displayed. This is one of the finest model ships available anywhere! Great Gift Item! The model ship sits perfectly on the included base, which is made of a high-quality, conditioned wood, and has a brass name plate. The Queen Mary Cruise ship model is built from scratch by experienced master craftsman and is not from any sort of kit. To create the subtle details and definitions of the deck and hull, the plank on frame method of construction is used, which requires hundreds of hours of pain-staking, detailed work.

The highest quality, rare woods (including Ebony, Rosewood, Blackwood, Mahogany, Jack wood, and Sycamore) used to construct our models are subjected to specific seasoning procedures to ensure that the model will withstand severe climate and never warp or split. Details and ornamentation such as anchors are sculpted of brass and stainless steel. The meticulously painted cruise ship accurately represents the true colors of the real Liner. Incredible details including pipes, ladders, vents, and life boats cover the deck of the ship.

Extensive research is required to build each model to scale, using various pictures, original plans, drawings, and digital imaging. Each model ship is examined during various stages of manufacturing and shipping to ensure the highest quality and accuracy possible for your investment.

Historic Past:

The Queen Mary is considered by many as the pinnacle of British passenger shipbuilding. The Cunard Line’s Star Flagship, Queen Mary, was laid down for construction as the Great depression gripped Europe, rendering circumstances unfeasible for ship building. Thus, the construction was held up from 1931 to 1934. The thousand foot passenger ship was built to trump its French rival to the crown of luxury, the Normandie. One of the most appealing characteristics of the Queen Mary was her great speed. Coupled with great luxury and comfort, this factor earned amazing profits for her owners until the outbreak of the Second World War, which found her in a New York Harbor.

After being idle for half a year, the Queen Mary re-entered service as a troopship, traveling unescorted from New York to Sydney. Ferrying troops between the Suez and Australia until the United States decided to take part in the fight, the Germans reportedly offered a quarter million reward for sinking this ridiculously fast passenger boat which their submarines could not keep up with. With its speed and finesse along the waters, the Queen Mary bested any warship afloat and adopted the nickname, “the Gray Ghost.”

The third largest passenger ship ever to set sail in the North Atlantic seaway, and the largest to survive, the Queen Mary is one of the recent reminders of the artistic and industrial genius that dominated the North Atlantic Ocean for over a century.

RMS Queen Mary is a retired ocean liner that sailed primarily in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1936 to 1967 for the Cunard Line (known as Cunard-White Star when the vessel entered service). Built by John Brown & Company in Clydebank, Scotland, Queen Mary along with her running mate, the RMS Queen Elizabeth, were built as part of Cunard's planned two-ship weekly express service between Southampton, Cherbourg, and New York City. The two ships were a British response to the superliners built by German and French companies in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Queen Mary was the flagship of the Cunard Line from May 1936 until October 1946 when she was replaced by Queen Elizabeth. The vessel also held the Blue Riband from 1936 to 1937 and then from 1938 to 1952 when she was beaten by the new SS United States, although it is worth noting that the United States required a subsidy to operate so the Queen Mary remains the fastest completely commercial Ocean liner ever.

Queen Mary sailed on her maiden voyage on 27 May 1936 and captured the Blue Riband in August of that year; she lost the title to SS Normandie in 1937 and recaptured it in 1938. With the outbreak of World War II, she was converted into a troopship and ferried Allied soldiers for the duration of the war. Following the war, Queen Mary was refitted for passenger service and along with Queen Elizabeth commenced the two-ship transatlantic passenger service for which the two ships were initially built. The two ships dominated the transatlantic passenger transportation market until the dawn of the jet age in the late 1950s. By the mid-1960s Queen Mary was ageing and though still among the most popular transatlantic liners, was operating at a loss.

After several years of decreased profits for Cunard Line, Queen Mary was officially retired from service in 1967. She left Southampton for the last time on 31 October 1967 and sailed to the port of Long Beach, California, United States, where she remains permanently moored. Much of the machinery including two of the four steam turbines, three of the four propellers, and all of the boilers were removed, and the ship now serves as a tourist attraction featuring restaurants, a museum, and hotel. The ship is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Derrick on 03/04/2013 01:09pm
Custom made for me

Add Your Review


Your Name:
Email Address:
Review:
Note: HTML is not translated! Your email address will not be shared with anyone.
Your Rating: 5
Verification:
Your Name:
Your Email:
Friends Name:
Friends Email:
Subject:
Message:
Verification:
Real Time Web Analytics