Queen Mary II Model Ship

SKU: 2SMSSC028
Stock: 3
Price:
$452.99

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Queen Mary II Ship Model Free Shipping

The Queen Mary II model ship measures 40"(long) 13.5"(high) 5.5 "(wide) app and is shipped fully assembled, ready to be displayed. This is one of the finest model ships available anywhere! Great Gift Item! The model ship sits perfectly on the included base, which is made of a high-quality, conditioned wood, and has a brass name plate. The Queen Mary II Cruise ship model is built from scratch by experienced master craftsman and is not from any sort of kit. To create the subtle details and definitions of the deck and hull, the plank on frame method of construction is used, which requires hundreds of hours of pain-staking, detailed work.

The highest quality, rare woods (including Ebony, Rosewood, Blackwood, Mahogany, Jack wood, and Sycamore) used to construct our models are subjected to specific seasoning procedures to ensure that the model will withstand severe climate and never warp or split. Details and ornamentation such as anchors are sculpted of brass and stainless steel. The meticulously painted cruise ship accurately represents the true colors of the real Liner. Incredible details including pipes, ladders, vents, and life boats cover the deck of the ship.

Extensive research is required to build each model to scale, using various pictures, original plans, drawings, and digital imaging. Each model ship is constructed for the highest accuracy possible for your investment.

Historical Past

Queen Mary II is the flagship of the Cunard Line. The ship was constructed to eventually replace the aging RMS Queen Elizabeth 2, the Cunard flagship from 1969 to 2004 and the last major ocean liner built before the construction of Queen Mary 2. Queen Mary 2 has the Royal Mail Ship (RMS) title conferred on her, as a gesture to Cunard's history, by Royal Mail when she entered service in 2004 on the Southampton to New York route.

Queen Mary II is not a steamship like many of her predecessors, but is powered primarily by four diesel engines, with two additional gas turbines used when extra power is required; this integrated electric propulsion configuration is used to produce the power to drive her four electric propulsion pods as well as powering the ship's hotel services.

Like her predecessor Queen Elizabeth 2 she is built for crossing the Atlantic Ocean, though she is regularly used for cruising; in the winter season she cruises from New York to the Caribbean on ten- or thirteen-day tours. Queen Mary 2's 30-knot (56 km/h; 35 mph) open ocean speed sets the ship apart from cruise ships, such as Oasis of the Seas, which has an average speed of 22.6 knots (41.9 km/h; 26.0 mph); QM2's normal service speed is 26 knots (48 km/h; 30 mph). While the hull of a cruise ship will typically have a block coefficient of 0.73 (a number closer to 1.0 would represent a rectangular block) Queen Mary 2 has a coefficient of 0.61

Her keel was laid down on 4 July 2002, in the construction dock at Saint-Nazaire, France, with the hull number G32. Approximately 3,000 craftsmen spent around eight million working hours on the ship, and around 20,000 people were directly or indirectly involved in her design, construction, and fitting out. In total, 300,000 pieces of steel were assembled into 94 "blocks" off the drydock, which were then stacked and welded together to complete the hull and superstructure. After floating out on 21 March 2003, the QM2 was fitted out in the large fitting out basin ("Bassin C"), the first ship to use this huge dry dock since the shipyard built large tankers in the 1970s, such as the MV Gastor. Her sea trials were conducted between 25 September-29 September and 7–11 November 2003, between Saint-Nazaire and the offshore islands of Ile d'Yeu and Belle-Ile. The final stages of construction were marred by a fatal accident on 15 November 2003, when a gangway collapsed under a group of shipyard workers and their relatives who had been invited to visit the vessel. In total, 32 people were injured and 16 were killed, after a 15-metre (49 ft) fall into the drydock.

Construction was completed on schedule. Cunard took delivery in Southampton, England on 26 December 2003. On 8 January 2004, the liner was named by her namesake's granddaughter, Queen Elizabeth II

 

 

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